The Inquirer-Home

ZTE Geek hands-on review

We get our mitts on ZTE's Clover Trail+ smartphone at IDF Beijing
Thu Apr 11 2013, 12:05

BEIJING: CHINESE PHONE MAKER ZTE announced the Intel powered and abysmally named Geek smartphone at the Intel Developer Forum (IDF) in Beijing on Wednesday, and we managed to score some time with the handset at the China show.

In terms of design, the ZTE Geek looks quite ordinary. The phone is crafted entirely in plastic, all in black. That's not necessarily a bad thing though, as although the handset will struggle to turn heads, it feels comfortable and slim in the hand.

ZTE Geek

Although we have yet to test this fully, the handset should be pretty rugged, too. Its casing feels plenty strong enough and its screen is coated with Corning's Gorilla Glass.

Thanks to the handset's Intel Clover Trail+ chip, the phone seemed quite responsive, suggesting good implementation of Android across the two cores with Hyperthreading. The Atom Z2580 processor is clocked at 2.0GHz, which is faster than the Ideaphone K900 from Lenovo that uses the same processor clocked at 1.8GHz, making for a great experience while gaming and watching videos.

ZTE Geek gaming

The display measures 5in and has HD 720p resolution, which is equivalent to 293ppi. This looked good on first impressions, although it might struggle to match some of its higher end competition.

The ZTE Geek has a 5in 720p screen

On the rear of the ZTE Geek is an 8MP camera, which didn't prove too great on first impression, especially when compared to the cameras on the Sony Xperia Z and HTC One. There's a 1MP camera on the front of the phone too, although we have yet to test this.

The ZTE Geek shown at IDF is not a retail model, so the quibbles that we found with the handset might be fixed before it's released. Check back soon for our full ZTE Geek review. µ

 

Share this:

blog comments powered by Disqus
Advertisement
Subscribe to INQ newsletters

Sign up for INQbot – a weekly roundup of the best from the INQ

Advertisement
INQ Poll

Microsoft's Windows 10 Preview has permission to watch your every move

Does Microsoft have the right to keylog users of its Windows 10 Technical Preview?