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Nintendo Wii U review

Tue Jan 29 2013, 16:33

Cost
The Wii U's affordable price is a big selling point for the console. Nintendo is offering the Wii U in three bundles. The first is available on Amazon for £220 and offers users an 8GB console, the Wii U Gamepad, power adaptors, an HDMI cable and a copy of Nintendo Land.

Those with a little more excess income can pick up the Premium pack for around £280, which offers an improved 32GB Wii U and adds a charging cradle and new Pro Controller. There is also a third Zombie U bundle, which is identical to the premium option but swaps Nintendo Land for Zombie U.

In Short
We're very impressed with the Nintendo Wii U. As with the Wii before it, Nintendo has bet big on innovations in gameplay rather than hardware.

The problem with this is that while the console's tablet-like Gamepad opens up a host of new gameplay options for developers, the Wii U still offers what is at best slightly better graphics than its present rivals, the Xbox 360 and Playstation 3.

Considering the lingering threat posed by the rumoured next-generation Sony Playstation 4 and Xbox 720 and the improved hardware and graphics they will undoubtedly feature, and we're thinking that the Wii U's long term appeal could be negligible.

A big factor in this will be Nintendo's ability to get developers interested in the Wii U and willing to take the time to think outside the box and develop game titles that make the most of its custom tablet controller.

Still, putting the question of its long term appeal aside, we'll say that the Wii U is, for now at least, the most interesting console on the market, and we wholeheartedly recommend that any gamer with some excess cash should check it out. µ

The Good
Tablet Gamepad, sleek design, social Miiverse community, increased app offering.

The Bad
Controller battery life isn't long enough.

The Ugly
Graphics aren't much better than the Xbox 360 and Playstation 3.

Bartender's Score
8/10

beer8

 

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