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HTC One X+ review

Thu Jan 24 2013, 12:29

Software
One thing that has changed, however, is the handset's software. The HTC One X+ arrives running Google's Android 4.1 Jelly Bean mobile operating system, the slickest version of Android yet.

HTC One X Plus comes with HTC's Sense user interface

However, this comes skinned with HTC's Sense user interface, which is well known as being one of the more obtrusive Android skins.

Despite this, we quite enjoyed using the interface on the One X+, and though we'd rather have done without it, HTC clearly has listened to feedback and stripped it down a little.

It's added a few of its own touches, such as Friendstream, integrated Beats Audio technology (without headphones), and its famous weather widget, but Android 4.1 Jelly Bean's selling points remain untouched.

For example, a long press on the phone's red home button will fire up Google Now, an Android 4.x Jelly Bean feature that we've praised in the past. Project Butter, a set of fixes to make Android more responsive, is implemented on the One X+ too, and is one of the factors behind its slick performance.

Design
The design of the HTC One X+ is visually exactly the same as that of the original One X.

We got our hands on the black model this time, rather than the white version, which both looks and feels great. The phone is very slim at just 8.9mm thin, a feature that is complemented by the handset's smooth and simple polycarbonate casing.

The HTC One X Plus comes with a polycarbonate casing

The polycarbonate case means that the handset should withstand a fair few knocks and tumbles, even if it does prove a nightmare for picking up dirt and fingerprints. Still, we think it's worth putting up with a few smears on the rear of the phone, as it and looks and feels more expensive than the competition, including the somewhat plasticky Samsung Galaxy S3.

Another design feature that we like is the slim bezel around the display, which makes the screen look larger than it actually is. This makes the touchscreen stand out too, which certainly is not a bad thing.

Next; Camera, battery and storage

 

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