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DMC: Devil May Cry review

A brutal combat heavy reboot of a classic series
Mon Jan 21 2013, 15:03

THE DEVIL MAY CRY franchise originally launched back in the early days of the Playstation 2.

Set in a dark world where demons waged war against mankind and its half demon reluctant guardian Dante, the story proved an instant hit with gamers.

Luckily, as well as having an awesome story the original Devil May Cry backed up its plot with brutal arcade style combat, engaging puzzles and entertaining console gameplay.

As a result, to this day the first Devil May Cry is still heralded as one of the best Playstation 2 games ever made and has become a full franchise in its own right, boasting a line of action figures, fan fiction and even its own anime series.

Since then, though, the Devil May Cry series has hit a few bumps in the road, spawning numerous direct sequels, some of which were of slightly questionable quality.

For this reason Capcom decided to start from scratch, taking a page out of DC and comic books and choosing to tell the story of another Dante on another world.

DMC Devil May Cry city

On this world the core elements of the story remain the same. Demons have invaded the world led by the evil arch demon Midas.

Equally, outside of having cropped black rather than snow-white hair, Dante is the same wise-cracking badass that he always was, albeit slightly younger than he was in the first game.

However despite these similarities, the look, feel and character of Dante's world are completely different from those of the original game. Where the first series was unashamedly gothic, the new DMC: Devil May Cry feels much more industrial.

From the opening sequence on, it has strong arcane-punk elements, with its cityscape full of random neon lights and close to derelict buildings that seem to be held together by the protruding menacing pipes and electrical wires.

Adding to the dark industrial tone of this dystopian landscape, crowds of people shuffle along like cattle unaware of the war around them.

 

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