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Nokia Lumia 920 review

Mon Nov 05 2012, 16:43

Performance
Thanks to the new found support of Windows Phone 8 for multicore processors, the Nokia Lumia 920 has a 1.5GHz dual-core Qualcomm Snapdragon MSM8960 processor, backed up by 1GB of RAM.

The Lumia 920 handset is noticeably faster than Nokia's last generation Lumia devices. Apps load almost instantly, webpages load quickly and swiping through the Windows Phone 8 interface proved to be a pleasure.

Connectivity
The Nokia Lumia 920 is an exclusive to EE in the UK, which means that it's one of the first devices in the country to boast 4G LTE connectivity. Unfortunately, we haven't been able to test LTE on this specific device, but when testing using the Huawei Ascend P1 LTE in Central London we've reached average download speeds of between 18Mbit/s and 22Mbit/s. This will appeal to those after superfast web browsing speeds, although EE's prices aren't all that appealing yet.

Nokia Lumia 920 web browser

As well as offering 4G LTE connectivity, the Nokia Lumia 920 will also be available with 3G via Orange and T-Mobile, and it comes with 802.11 a/b/g/n WiFi connectivity.

NFC is also included, but it's fair to say that there's not much use for this in the UK yet. Sure, there's the ability to transfer files between two NFC handsets, but how many people do you know that also have a Nokia Lumia 920?

Battery and storage
The Nokia Lumia 920 comes with a 2,000mAh battery, which goes part way to explaining its hefty 182g weight. According to Nokia, that gives you 10 hours of talk time and 67 hours of music playback.

The handset's battery life fell slightly short of Nokia's promise, but wasn't as bad as some of its rivals. We found that the Lumia 920 generally lasted between seven to eight hours of heavy usage, and it managed to last almost two days when moderately used.

Another of the handset's standout features is the fact that it comes with a wireless charger. We now despise phones that don't, as this makes recharging this phone extremely convenient. Sure, this might make us merely lazy, but we were soon won over by the ability to charge the handset simply by dropping it onto its charging plate.

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