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CES: Samsung Series 9 13in laptop hands on review

Korean firm looks to attract users with a 400nit display
Wed Jan 11 2012, 05:05

KOREAN HARDWARE GIANT Samsung has launched its second generation Series 9 laptop at CES as the firm tries to take on Apple's Macbook Air and the raft of ultrabooks that are on the horizon.

The Series 9 weighs 1.16kg, making it very lightweight. The 12.9mm chassis houses a 13in IPS display with 1600x900 resolution. The screen also has an impressive brightness level of 400nits. Despite being extremely thin and light, we found the laptop to feel quite sturdy.

Samsung Series 9 13in laptop side on

Samsung offers a choice of Intel Core i5 and Core i7 processors and up to 8GB of RAM. A 256GB SSD allows for very fast resume times. The laptop will boot from deep hibernation in 9.8 seconds and wake up in 1.4 seconds.

A Samsung spokesperson also told The INQUIRER that the device has been built to ensure that users don't lose any work. Even if users find they have run out of battery, the laptop will retain some charge to power the RAM and allow users to restart the device from where they left off when it is plugged in. However, it is unclear exactly how long the RAM will remain charged.

Samsung Series 9 13in keyboard

We weren't too impressed by the keyboard during our hands on testing. The keys felt far too shallow, a problem that has plagued many a device, even the Macbook Air.

Connectivity features include a USB 3.0 port, a USB 2.0 port, a headphone/microphone jack and an SD card slot. Samsung has also squeezed in an Ethernet port, as well as HDMI and VGA connectors.

The company claims the battery will last around 6 hours, which is not quite all day but will be long enough for most people.

Samsung expects to announce the release date and pricing for its Series 9 laptop soon. µ

 

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