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Apple forgot to copyright OSX, outfit claims

Psystar goes psycho
Tue Dec 23 2008, 10:34

CHEEKY MAC CLONER and thorn in Apple's side, Psystar has claimed that Apple has no right to restrict how the OSX operating system is used... because it doesn't legally own it.

The Miami-based chancers have filed court papers which claim that the Cupertino company "is prohibited from bringing action against Psystar for the alleged infringement of one or more of the plaintiff's copyrights" because of a "failure to register said copyrights with the copyright office as required".

We don't know where Psystar hired its lawyers, but we reckon any law-talking-guy worth his salt should have access to the Interwibble, where a quick search at the US Copyright Office's web site would have unearthed this.

That coupled with the fact that the very act of creating a piece of software means that is protected under US copyright laws leads us to believe that Psystar may well have realised that it is fighting a losing battle and is delaying its inevitable demise under the weight of Apple's legal might.

In a long-running legal battle which has involved suits and counter-suits flying back and forth between the computing Goliath and the nit-picking David (has anyone else noticed that Psytsar rhymes with shyster and is very nearly an anagram of Parasyte?) the Miami company's latest filing also accuses Apple of including undocumented code in its operating system which prevents it from being used on a non Apple computer.

Psystar claims that this is a violation of anti-trust laws and that it should be allowed to do whatever it wants with Apple's operating system. µ

See Also
Leopard runs on non-Core 2 Duo systems
Apple says others are behind Psystar's misdeeds
Apple is not a monopoly
Psystar plans Mac Clone notebook and Blu-ray desktop
Apple backs down on Psystar Case
Apple countersued by Psystar
Apple fires first shot in Clone Wars
OSX runs on MSI Wind
Psystar pokes Apple with server stick
Psystar has now shipped at least two machines

And more using site search

 

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