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Tim Cook promises to polish Apple iCloud security

Denies Apple is to blame for celebrity hacking scandal
Fri Sep 05 2014, 09:56

Apple iCloud logoAPPLE CEO Tim Cook has denied that flaws in iCloud security contributed to the celebrity hacking scandal this week, but added that the firm will do more to improve its security.

The leak, which saw a number of celebrities' private photos exposed, has been blamed on iCloud. Apple has addressed this security breach already, but Tim Cook gilded the lily in an interview with the Wall Street Journal.

Apple's initial response was to deny that iCloud security had been breached and to advise people that best practice online involves strong passwords and two factor authentication.

"After more than 40 hours of investigation, we have discovered that certain celebrity accounts were compromised by a very targeted attack on user names, passwords and security questions, a practice that has become all too common on the internet. None of the cases we have investigated has resulted from any breach in any of Apple's systems including iCloud or Find my iPhone," it said.

"To protect against this type of attack, we advise all users to always use a strong password and enable two-step verification."

Things have moved on a little since then, and in his first interview since the content was released and the news broke Cook said that Apple will do a little more. He revealed that the Cupertino company will give users a warning whenever someone attempts to change a password on an account.

"When I step back from this terrible scenario that happened and say what more could we have done, I think about the awareness piece," he said to the newspaper. "I think we have a responsibility to ratchet that up. That's not really an engineering thing."

He added that Apple is possibly angrier than any of the affected celebrities, saying, "We want to do everything we can do to protect our customers, because we are as outraged if not more so than they are." µ

 

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