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Microsoft must give China an antitrust response in 20 days

Authorities peeking through Windows into Microsoft Office
Mon Sep 01 2014, 11:06
Chinese authorities have given Microsoft 20 days to answer antitrust questions

CHINESE AUTHORITIES have given Microsoft 20 days to reply to its antitrust investigation of Windows and Microsoft Office software.

This has happened rather quickly. We first got wind of the investigation in July when China raided Microsoft offices in that country. Since then things have become rather more formal. Now China has given Microsoft a deadline.

In August we asked Microsoft for its view on the antitrust investigation, and it told The INQUIRER that it was complying with Chinese requests and will work with the Chinese authorities.

"We're serious about complying with China's laws and committed to addressing SAIC's questions and concerns," said a spokesperson.

In a statement on its website the Chinese SAIC, the State Administration for Industry and Commerce, confirmed its deadline. We have automatically translated it, but we're sure you'll get the jist - the 20 days reference is the important bit.

"Mr Chen Shi, vice president of Microsoft's line, anti-monopoly investigation and inquiry, require Microsoft to its integrated case and Microsoft Windows operating system and [Microsoft] Office business software-related information is not fully reflected compatibility issues and other related issues caused public, make a written explanation within 20 days."

We have asked Microsoft for its view regarding China's 20-day deadline.

The Chinese authorities are making something of a push against overseas IT hardware and software vendors, and have vocally accused the US of installing and shipping spyware to overseas market.

On the other side is the US, which has something of a division between industry and government. While the US government has accused the Chinese military of hacking its utilities and companies, industry has accused the US government of intrusive, overreaching surveillance. µ

 

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