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Netflix open sources internet security tools

Scumblr, Sketchy and Workflowable open to all
Thu Aug 28 2014, 17:35
Netflix open sources internet security tools

VIDEO STREAMING SERVICE Netflix released three internet security monitoring tools this week as open source.

Scumblr can be used to do automated or manual keyword searches against Google, Facebook, Twitter and other websites for data of interest for internet security monitoring purposes. Workflowable is able to organise and prioritise the search results and supports plugins to set triggers for automating monitoring responses, and Sketchy captures screenshots of interesting items for review by human staff.

The three components work together to help Netflix maintain constant awareness of security threats facing its operations in real time. The firm has released all three packages under open-source licensing at its Github website.

In a Netflix blog post, Andy Hoernecke and Scott Behrens of the firm's Cloud Security Team explained, "Many security teams need to stay on the lookout for internet-based discussions, posts, and other bits that may be of impact to the organisations they are protecting. These teams then take a variety of actions based on the nature of the findings discovered. Netflix's security team has these same requirements, and today we're releasing some of the tools that help us in these efforts."

The web software technology involved is sophisticated and includes Ruby on Rails, Redis, Sidekiq, Python, Flask, PhantomJS, Celery and backend databases.

Netflix said, "Scumblr and Sketchy are helping the Netflix security team keep an eye on potential threats to our environment every day. We hope that the open source community can find new and interesting uses for the newest additions to the Netflix Open Source Software initiative. "

Netflix should be commended for demonstrating its commitment to open source and proactive support of the web development and internet security communities, we reckon. µ

 

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