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Seagate is first past the post with an 8TB hard drive

Fewer drives means less maintenance
Tue Aug 26 2014, 15:50
Seagate has beaten several other companies working on 8TB drives

SEAGATE HAS BECOME the first disk drive maker to ship an 8TB hard drive.

The 3.5in SATA3 hard drive is designed for data centres and servers with an eye to cloud content and backup disaster recovery storage. It comes with multi-disc RV tolerance to bolster performance.

"As our world becomes more mobile, the number of devices we use to create and consume data is driving an explosive growth in unstructured data. This places increased pressure on cloud builders to look for innovative ways to build cost-effective, high capacity storage for both private and cloud-based data centres," said Seagate VP of marketing Scott Horn, citing the new drive as what the world has been waiting for.

The higher capacity, the company believes, will lead to lower maintenance bills and will reduce the watt per gigabyte ratio, while also offering a low cost price per gigabyte. It can also be used to maximise the amount of storage achievable in the minimum floor space, an important consideration in increasingly crowded server rooms.

This year has seen some major breakthroughs in hard drive capacity, with the announcement of the 10,000RPM HGST C10K1800 and the Optimus Max, the first 4TB SSD drive from Sandisk, as parity between the capacities and pricing of the two storage types begins to converge.

Earlier this year, QNAP adapted its hardware to accept the 6TB HGST Ultrastar He6, a drive filled with helium in order to enable increasing its capacity and performance.

Full specifications and pricing on Seagate's 8TB hard drive are yet to be announced, but it will be shipping to selected customers immediately, with wider availability next quarter. µ

 

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