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Google gets over one million 'piracy' takedown requests per day

Transparency report reveals growing numbers
Fri Aug 22 2014, 10:24
Google gets over one millio DCMA  takedown requests per day

GOOGLE HAS RELEASED a transparency report revealing that it gets around one million Digital Millennium Copyright Act (DMCA) takedown requests every day.

The internet giant release the report on Thursday, which shows Google updating its information on who comes knocking, when they come knocking, what they were after and whether or not Google delivered.

The firm reported that it gets an average of 30,143,926 requests every month related to around 50,000 domains. There seems to be a hard core of about 5,000 reporting organisations.

Of these the most regular complainer has been the UK British Phonographic Industry, and in the last month it lodged 6,335,726 requests with Google. In total has been responsible for taking down some 93 million links. Also present on the list, and call us unsurprised, are the Recording Industry Association of America (RIAA), Degban, Markmonitor and Fox.

A number of domains dominated the list of reported websites, and top of these was a destination called Listengo.com. Also ranking high on the rightsholder organisations' target list were 4shared and Rapidgator.net, along with some 48,000 others.

A graph shows there was a steady buildup to the massive number of DMCA related requests that Google gets today, and the chart began to shoot up in May 2012. As of August 2014 it is at its highest point.

According to the figures the August high point showed a gain of around one million requests per week against previous weeks.

Google does not comply with all requests it receives and it listed a couple of examples of items to which it did not positively respond. µ

 

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