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HGST unveils SSD capable of three million IOPS

PCM drive is super speedy, says HGST
Mon Aug 04 2014, 16:40
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HGST HAS ANNOUNCED its PCM solid-state disk (SSD) drive, which it claims is "the world's fastest SSD", at the Flash Summit in Santa Clara, California.

The new SSD uses a completely new architecture compared to present commercial models. The result uses a PCIe interface to deliver three million random read I/Os per second (IOPS) of 512 bytes each, with a random read latency of 1.5 microseconds.

HGST CEO Steve Campbell said, "The PCM SSD demonstration is a great example for how HGST sets the pace of the rapidly evolving storage industry.

"This technology is the result of several years of research and advanced development aimed at delivering new levels of acceleration for enterprise applications. The combination of HGST's low-latency interface protocol and next generation non-volatile memories delivers unprecedented performance, and creates exciting opportunities for new software and system architectures."

Along with the announcement came a new HGST range of PCIe accelerators under the FlashMAX III brand. Capable of 540,000 random read IOPS, the PCI Express 3.0 accelerators are compatible with Windows Server and Linux based systems.

The final announcement was HGST Servercache, a software suite that allows IT administrators to roll out a hybrid flash environment on their existing networks.

No pricing is available yet for FlashMAX but it is expected to launch in the third quarter. Servercache is available now at $995 per server after a 30-day trial.

The Flashmax range follows on from last week's announcement of three new Ultrastar SSDs aimed at the online gaming market, and last year's world's first helium-filled disk drive µ

 

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