The Inquirer-Home

Hundreds of Microsoft staff take to Chinese streets to protest mass job cull

Firm isn't having a good time in China
Fri Aug 01 2014, 13:29
signage-microsoft

HUNDREDS OF MICROSOFT EMPLOYEES in China protested against the firm's impending layoffs on Friday, slamming the job cuts as "hostile" and "violent".

Microsoft announced its largest job cull to date last month, with new CEO Satya Nadella confirming that 18,000 jobs will be cut at the firm, 12,500 of which will be in its Nokia division.

This news hasn't been met kindly by Microsoft's Chinese employees, which on Friday took to the streets to protest the mass layoffs, Reuters reported.

"Hundreds" of employees working under Microsoft's Nokia arm reportedly took part in the rally at Microsoft's Bejing research centre and factory, where the firm employs 2,400 staff. A source at the demonstration told Reuters that the protestors were waving banners and shouting chants about "Microsoft's hostile takeover and violent layoffs".

The protests reportedly lasted for around five hours until the protestors "had sore throats", Reuters' source said. Microsoft has yet to respond.

This isn't the only trouble the firm has been facing in China. Earlier this week, China state Administration of Industry and Commerce reportedly raised Microsoft premises in Bejing, which it has since been revealed was due to an "anti monopoly" investigation.

During what was described as a "sudden visit" to Microsoft offices, Chinese authorities reportedly snatched-and-grabbed copies of financial statements and emails, in order to investigate the firm following accusations that it has broke "strict antimonopoly rules."

A Microsoft spokeswoman said, "We aim to build products that deliver the features, security and reliability customers expect and we're happy to answer the government's questions." µ

 

Share this:

blog comments powered by Disqus
Advertisement
Subscribe to INQ newsletters

Sign up for INQbot – a weekly roundup of the best from the INQ

Advertisement
INQ Poll

Internet of Things at Christmas poll

Which smart device are you hoping Santa brings?