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Star.21 is a £19 fitness tracker that aims to permanently change your attitude to health

Brings 'gamification to fitness'
Mon Jul 28 2014, 14:07

A FITNESS BAND priced at just £19 has hit crowd funding website Pozible with the aim to change users' fitness routines for the long term by focusing on forming habits over 21 days.

Star21 fitness band

Named Star.21, the fitness band is a pedometer, calorie counter, sleep monitor, sleep reminder, clock and alarm but looks to get its users to rely on its functions by "bringing gamification to fitness" and challenging users to hit daily exercise targets or else they will "fall back a level".

The band's maker Oaxis hopes this idea of using game thinking and game mechanics in non-game contexts to engage users in solving problems will encourage users to stick to their fitness goals and make it part of their daily routine as opposed to feeling like a chore.

star 21 fitness band close up

The band relies on 21 "Star" LEDs to communicate how far users have achieved their goals. These allow users to track all their daily activities and provide the number of calories burned according to your personal metrics by working alongside an app, which it connects to over Android or iOS using industry standard Bluetooth 4.0 BLE technology.

"Most Fitness Bands today do not work because the novelty is short lived" said Oaxis CEO, G-Jay Yong. "Our human brain is capable of rewiring itself in 21 days to establish new neural pathways. Through 21 days of repetitive actions, the long lasting healthy habits can be formed."

star 21 fitness band off

Yong said this is based on Dr Maxwell Maltz's "21 days to form a habit" study. "We designed our app on this principal concept to encourage the user to persevere through the 21 days," he added.

Oaxis said this 21 day cycle comprises of three stages: Day 1 to 7, behaviours are "deliberate and unnatural", with users requiring constant reminders; day 8 to 21, behaviours are "deliberate but natural", with users still requiring conscious control; and day 22 to 90, with behaviours becoming "unconscious and natural", where the user does not require reminders and conscious control anymore.

With the Star.21 app, Oaxis believes that by day 21 users experience a more natural attitude to working out with it becoming second nature, just like eating and drinking and by day 91, "what seemed to be impossible to the user before, now is natural from this day."

star 21 fitness band and app

Whether this is all marketing guff to convince users to buy remains to be seen, but be sure to check back soon for a full review when we have tested it out for ourselves and we'll let you know.

We got a quick hands-on with the Star.21 fitness band ahead of launch. The strap is easy to fasten and it does appear rather elegant in design. Though the "2 star" display does seem a little feminine looking, even in the standard black colour, but all in all it did feel very light weight, weighing just 18g, and thus comfortable when fastened on the wrist.

star 21 fitness band and app lights

The Star.21 fitness band is also IP57 waterproof and dustproof, meaning you don't have to take it off to go swimming, and its inbuilt 50mAh rechargeable battery can be recharged using standard microUSB to USB cable and powers it for 15 days. Oaxis said its fitness wearable will track pedometer data recording for up to seven days and sleep data recording for up to 2 days.

The 21 LED lights are viewable even in bright outdoor lighting and we were generally happy with it overall feel of the fitness band on our wrist. It's made of thermoplastic polyurethane, a bio-compatible material, so good news for the environment if users get bored of it and throw it in the bin.

The Star.21 band is available now in black from Pozible if you pledge £19, with a delivery estimate of September this year. The band will retail for £55 when it hits the shops. µ

 

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