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Amazon Fire Phone is harder to fix than the Galaxy S5, iPhone 5S

Gets a repairability score of just three out of 10
Fri Jul 25 2014, 10:03
Amazon Fire Phone teardown

ONLINE RETAIL GIANT Amazon's Fire Phone is more difficult to repair than the Galaxy S5 and iPhone 5S, iFixit's prompt teardown of the smartphone has revealed.

Amazon's Fire Phone is out in the US today, and it so far has been met with mixed reviews.

iFixit hasn't had much nice to say about the Fire Phone either, having torn the smartphone apart to see how easy it is to put back together. As it turned out, it's not easy at all, with iFixit giving the handset a repairability score of three out of 10. This is lower than the five out of 10 scored by the Samsung Galaxy S5, and the six out of 10 given to the iPhone 5S*.

This low score, according to iFixit, was due to many reasons, the first of these being the mass of cables stuffed inside the handset that "make disassembly tedious and reassembly difficult".

The teardown team then found itself struggling to pull out the handset's front-facing Dynamic Perspective cameras, which it moaned are "glued solidly in place".

"This glue means we have some hacking, slashing, heating, and prying before we get these bad boys free," iFixit added.

Thanks to these firmly stuck-in cameras, iFixit noted that a replacement display assembly will need to include four replacement cameras, which could be expensive. What's more, as the handset isn't modular, iFixit noted that several components share cables, which is also likely to increase the cost of repair.

iFixit encountered its final difficulties when it came to the handset's battery, saying, "While adhesive tabs on the battery ease its removal, it's still a pretty tricky job - if you break the (flimsy) pull tabs, you'll be heating and prying." It added that the battery also got quite hot during its time pulling apart the device, with iFixit noting that the handset is aptly named.

It wasn't all bad news, though. iFixit did say however that Amazon's use of Torx T3 screws - a design element "very similar to the current crop of iPhones" - meant it was easy to get inside the phone. µ

 

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