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Kaspersky: Government isn't doing enough to educate about cybercrime

Says bigger marketing campaigns are needed to alert mainstream citizens
Fri Jul 18 2014, 16:35
Kaspersky Lab European hub Paddington

THE UK GOVERNMENT isn't doing enough to warn about the risks of cybercrime on a mass level, security firm Kaspersky has claimed.

Speaking at a company roundtable event at the firm's European hub in London on Thursday, Kaspersky security researcher David Emm said isn't doing as much as it could be to educate people about cyber security.

"I'd like to see the government doing more to get the message out to mainstream citizens and individuals because that's the bone in which the industry is growing; the individuals with ideas," Emm said

"If you look at it, the recent Cyber Street Wise campaign aside, I don't think the government is doing very much in terms of mainstream messaging and I would certainly like to see it do more."

Emm used the example of major UK marketing campaigns promoting the dangers of drink driving as an ideal model because they have been drilled into us over the years.

"As parents, we've this body of common sense, such as drinks driving, and it's drip, drip, drip, over the years that has achieved that and I think we need to get to a point where we have some body of online common sense in which business people can draw upon; there's definitely a role for education."

Barclay's bank, which was also present at the roundtable, agreed with Emm.

"The government really needs to recognise this is a serious issue - if you're bright enough to set up your own business, you're bright enough to protect yourself," added the firm's MD of fraud prevention Alex Grant.

Emm concluded by saying that the government's Cyber Street Wise campaign that was launched in January was good enough to make people aware of the risks of cybercrime in the metropolitan areas. However, he said he'd like to see the government focus more on regional areas as people in sparsely populated areas weren't as aware of it.

Kaspersky's roundtable took place as part of the firm's launch of a report that found small businesses in the UK are "woefully unprepared" for an IT security breach, despite relying increasingly on mobile devices and storing critical information on computers.

The study found that nearly a third, or 31 percent, of small businesses would not know what to do if they had an IT security breach tomorrow, with four in ten saying that they would struggle to recover all data lost and a quarter admitting they would be unable to recover any. µ

 

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