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Google's Chrome 37 will look a little crisper in Windows

Directwrite is a bonus addition
Fri Jul 18 2014, 11:52

Google Chrome logoGOOGLE HAS RELEASED Chrome Beta 37, just a day after declaring version 36 stable.

Chrome Beta 37 boasts some noteworthy changes, and this time it seems that the focus is on features, not just bug fixes and tweaks, although Google assured us that there are plenty of those too.

The most obvious change for the casual user comes from the implementation of Directwrite in Windows. Using an API in Directx, it allows Cleartype rendering of fonts, or, to put it another way, it'll look a that bit nicer, and more like the crispness you see on a Chromebook.

Google has completely redesigned the password manager user interface. This is the first major change in some time and reflects the present focus on security as users seek to be safer online.

If your network connection temporarily drops, Chrome Beta 37 will automatically reload the page as soon as it is able - a neat trick for anyone who has ever used WiFi on a train, for example.

The other major change is that Chrome apps will no longer require a sign-in. Previously, a Google account was required to use them. It's unlikely that you'd run Chrome without being a Google subscriber, but the option is one more little nod to openness. In May, Google put the buffers on third party extensions being installed from outside the Chrome Store in an attempt to bolster security.

Over in the developers channel, Chrome 38 reportedly is taking its first faltering steps, with Google looking to work on improving battery life. 

Going by current release cycles, we can expect a stable release of Chrome 37 in late August, maybe early September, but in the meantime, those interested can download it now. µ

 

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