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UK cops embrace crime-fighting face recognition tech

All your faces belong to us, etc
Thu Jul 17 2014, 11:57
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SMILE, the UK police have begun testing face recognition technology as a means of spotting and collaring criminals.

It is become increasingly difficult to think of crime prevention technology, tricks and tactics that are not being used by the authorities.

Google Glass is being tested by the NYPD, crime prediction technology is being trialed, and now in Leicester the police have taken another Orwellian leap - this time toward facial recognition technology that can compare evidence and scan for the faces of those well known to the police.

The Leicester Police news website is thrilled with the adoption and its possibilities, and is looking foward to seeing how its trial period works out.

"We're very proud to be the first UK police force to evaluate this new system," said chief inspector Chris Cockerill. "Initial results have been very promising and we're looking forward to seeing what can be achieved throughout the six-month trial."

So far so good, is the impression that we get, and the force said that so far it has had a lot of success.

"The computer program has been under evaluation for a couple of months and around two hundred suspects have already been put through the system, with a high success rate of identification," it added.

The system is called Neoface and comes from NEC. The Leicester police appears to be stuffing it with information. With such information and content comes great responsibility.

"We have over ninety-thousand photos on our system and Neo-Face can compare someone's image against our complete databases in seconds," added identity unit manager Andy Ramsay.

"Besides the speed it's also impressive because it can even find family members related to the person we're trying to identify." µ

 

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