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LG G3 Beat arrives to challenge Samsung's Galaxy S5 Mini

Mid-tier smartphone offers stripped-down LG G3 experience
Thu Jul 17 2014, 10:52

LG G3 Beat with Android 4.4 KitkatKOREAN PHONE MAKER LG has unveiled the LG G3 Beat, a "mid-tier variant" of its flagship LG G3 smartphone.

The LG G3 Beat joins the crowded market of mid-range smartphones, such as the Galaxy S5 Mini and HTC One Mini, and is aimed at those who don't fancy forking out for its flagship device.

"Smartphone manufacturers cannot ignore this growing segment of consumers who want the best balance of looks, features, performance and, of course, price," said LG CEO and president Dr Jong-seok Park.

"The LG G3 Beat represents our commitment to the mid-tier smartphone market that demands mature technology, proven branding, great innovation and attractive price, all in a single device."

There's no fancy QHD screen onboard the LG G3 Beat, as the handset instead has a downgraded 5in 1280x720 resolution screen powered by a quad-core 1.2GHz Qualcomm Snapdragon 400 processor. There's also 1GB of RAM, Google's Android 4.4 Kitkat mobile operating system and 8GB of internal storage, expandable via microSD card.

While the LG G3 Beat is a lower specification version of the LG G3, the handset boasts the same laser autofocus, which is paired with an 8MP rear camera. You'll also find the same 4G LTE support, Bluetooth 4.0 connectivity and LG's custom software features - such as Smart Keyboard and Gesture Shot. However, the LG G3 Beat improves on its predecessor's battery, touting a 2,450mAh removable battery.

The LG G3 Beat will go on sale in South Korea on Friday, in the same gold, black and white flavours as its predecessor. The firm said that it will announce European availability "soon", and said that the phone will be known as the LG G3 S when it arrives. µ

 

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