The Inquirer-Home

Rackspace offers 1,000 percent guarantee on managed cloud

Puts its money where its servers are
Tue Jul 15 2014, 14:06
Rackspace logo

RACKSPACE HAS SCOTCHED RUMOURS that it wants to exit the cloud market, coupling its latest offering with a cash guarantee.

The company has launched a managed cloud offering, giving customers cloud scalability without all the tedious maintenance involved. Customers can choose from basic managed infrastructure or a complete managed operations approach.

When required, for example during a rollout or rollback, Rackspace will ramp up the service to cope with demand, and has guaranteed that, should its infrastructure not be able to cope with the increase in demand, it will pay customers ten times the service level agreement price in compensation.

Rackspace VP of technology Nigel Beighton told The INQUIRER, "We believe in the product and our capacity to deliver, so we thought the best thing to do is put our money where our mouth is."

Rackspace will price the service "with a cloud ethos" and, as part of its differentiation from the rest of the market, the company plans to offer specific named support individuals with direct lines, so that in the event of a problem customers are not directed to anonymous call centres.

The firm is building the service on the recently launched Onmetal Openstack framework, which Rackspace plans to roll out to all of its data centres over the next year to eighteen months.

Beighton said, "This is what managed cloud is all about - the best infrastructure fit to business needs combined with specialised expertise and fanatical support."

In conjunction with the launch, Rackspace has launched a "developer+" service offering free and discounted hosting to assist developers with building and testing their apps before full rollout. µ

 

Share this:

blog comments powered by Disqus
Advertisement
Subscribe to INQ newsletters

Sign up for INQbot – a weekly roundup of the best from the INQ

Advertisement
INQ Poll

Dead electronic devices to be banned on US-bound flights

Will the new rules banning uncharged devices be effective?