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Verizon tells Netflix, 'It's not us, it's you'

Says speed problems are at Netflix end
Fri Jul 11 2014, 16:47
verizon

VERIZON HAS HIT BACK at claims that it is the cause of congestion affecting customers of the Netflix streaming service, instead claiming that Netflix is to blame.

Verizon issued a blog post yesterday, responding to Netflix's decision to shame it in on-screen messages during buffering. The US cable carrier obtained a cease and desist order.

In the blog, entitled "Why is Netflix Buffering? Dispelling the Congestion Myth", Netflix VP of federal regulatory affairs David Young explained that after an investigation and review there were no blockages found in the Verizon network.

Rather, Young said that the problem occurs "at the interconnection link to the edge of our network (the border router) used by the transit providers chosen by Netflix to deliver video traffic to Verizon's network".

He went on to explain that Netflix had not, in the opinion of Verizon, made the necessary arrangements for the amount of traffic, estimated to be around a third of all US internet traffic, to be carried to homes and said, "Netflix is fully capable of taking the necessary and customary steps to ensure that its connections match its traffic volumes."

Netflix, however would echo Verizon's detractors, who believe that the carrier needs to make enough provision for the information it carries to reach its destination unimpeded.

As the war of words goes on, behind closed doors the US Federal Communications Commission (FCC) is debating whether to deregulate the internet by allowing so-called "fast lane" traffic at an additional charge, effectively ending net neutrality for American internet users.

The war of words between Verizon and Netflix has been going on since the initial appeal ruling that opened the door for Verizon and other large internet service providers (ISPs) to press for the end of net neutrality. µ

 

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