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WEDG is the latest post-Snowden personal cloud

WEDG you believe it
Fri Jul 11 2014, 13:46
WEDG hits Kickstarter

THE WEDG is the latest entrant in the burgeoning market in ultra-secure storage and communications services.

The device called The WEDG claims to be "The world's most secure, complete cloud solution".

Designed by Mancunian Shehbaz Afza, The WEDG offers password or PIN protected PGP security layering and 512-bit encryption to create a personal cloud for storage, email access as well as shared calendars and contact lists.

Afza said, "Like many of us, when the Snowden report was published I felt instantly uneasy with the products that I had relied on and trusted with my digital privacy. That got me thinking that there has to be a better way to use the cloud and when I couldn't find a solution, I decided to build one myself."

The WEDG uses no remote networks and has a replaceable, upgradeable hard drive, two selling points that differentiate it from similar devices. It has interfaces available for Windows, Android, iOS and Blackberry.

The company claims that The WEDG is also secure for Bitcoin storage to avoid the need to use internet based Bitcoin vaults of the type that have been targetted by cyber criminals.

In May, German company Protonet raised $1m in 90 minutes with its own version of a secure post-Snowden server.

The WEDG device will be available in 1TB and 2TB capacities starting at £149. Although it can be synced with remote data locations and external clouds, its default is not to allow contact with any of them.

The WEDG is presently pursuing a Kickstarter campaign to enable it to begin production, with a target of £90,000.

And yes, the top of the device that contours inwards? That really is the thin end of The WEDG. µ

 

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