The Inquirer-Home

Motorola faces Moto X, Moto G sales ban in Germany

Android smartphones found to infringe antenna patents
Thu Jul 10 2014, 16:37

Motorola's Moto G features a quad-core Qualcomm processor and Android 4.3 Jelly BeanMOTOROLA FACES seeing some of its smartphones removed from shelves in Germany for patent infringement.

The Mannheim Regional Court in Germany ruled this week that some Motorola phones, including the Moto X and Moto G, infringe a patent owned by German laser specialist firm LPFK.

The German firm, which has quick to boast about its court victory, patented the process by which an antenna is placed on to a curved plastic design, and despite this practice being commonplace, a German court ruled that Motorola infringes this patent.

Subsequently, the Mannheim court has ordered Motorola Deutschland and Motorola Mobility USA to refrain from selling phones that infringe the patent in Germany, which include the Moto X and Moto G, and pay compensation. A damages amount has not yet been announced.

Motorola Deutschland is also required to recall all smartphones it sold to business users that infringe on the patent in question.

A Motorola spokesperson told the BBC, "We are disappointed in the decision but Motorola has taken steps to avoid any interruption in supply."

LPFK CEO Dr Ingo Bretthauer commented on the ruling, and said now that it has been successful in Germany, it will look to take down Motorola in China. He said, "The more attractive a patent is, the harder you have to work to defend it.

"We will continue to fight for our patent in China and systematically take action against infringers outside China. This is part and parcel of a technology company's everyday business."

In similar news, Apple could see the iPhone and iPad banned in China, after a court ruled that Siri infringes patents held by a Chinese technology firm. µ

 

Share this:

blog comments powered by Disqus
Advertisement
Subscribe to INQ newsletters

Sign up for INQbot – a weekly roundup of the best from the INQ

Advertisement
INQ Poll

Microsoft's Windows 10 Preview has permission to watch your every move

Does Microsoft have the right to keylog users of its Windows 10 Technical Preview?