The Inquirer-Home

Amazon launches its Wearable Technology Store in the UK

As consumers increasingly obsess over sports trackers, smartwatches and wearable cameras
Mon Jul 07 2014, 14:18

Samsung Gear Live in wine reddAS THE WORLD of wearable technology heats up and devices begin to hit the market, Amazon.co.uk has announced the launch of its Wearable Technology Store.

Now live at www.amazon.co.uk/wearabletechnology, the store features over 100 different wearable devices including activity trackers, smartwatches, smart glasses and wearable cameras.

Featuring big names in technology such as Sony, Samsung, Garmin, Jawbone and Gopro, the store will also sell products from emerging brands like Basis and Misfit, Amazon said.

"Customers will be able to learn about devices which are 'coming soon' and be amongst the first to purchase the latest technology by pre-ordering new releases, including the A. Sauvage Wireless Charging Trousers," Amazon said in its announcement.

The new store also features a Learning Centre for those not familiar with the inner workings of wearable devices, including product details, compatibility information, images, videos, reviews and buying guides.

"Sales of wearable technology devices have taken off in the last year with many customers already using them on a daily basis," said Amazon director of consumer electronics Andrew Milliken.

"With designs continually becoming simpler, smaller, and more stylish, devices have become increasingly useful and fit seamlessly into everyday life. The focus is also on providing customers with all the information they need to understand these new devices and make the best possible choice."

Although Amazon is facilitating the growing trend in the technology industry for wearable devices, potential customers should realise that they probably shouldn't be trusted just yet, and the idea of shifting the collection of such sensitive and important personal information about our health to a device could be a dangerous thing. We are relying too heavily on these now very accessible devices to provide accurate statistics on our health and fitness and it's likely that we are getting carried away with the idea, so much so that we are failing to track the wearables themselves, and whether they are doing their job properly.

As mentioned in an opinion piece about wearables the other week, our views on this area developed during a charity hike across the length of the Outer Hebrides in June, when this writer and 14 other UK technology journalists tracked our activities with a range of different wearables.

What struck and worried us while completing the 135 miles of walking, cycling and kayaking were the anomalies between each of our wearable devices. Each and every one of them depended on the same type of technology to present readings to their respective users, and what we found surprising was that none of them told the same story.

On our walk we compared readings from our wearables and fitness tracking applications to find that, most of the time, not one of them showed the same readings. Subsequently, we found that we should perhaps be more critical of the tracking devices we have tied to our limbs, and question whether wearable fitness tracking devices are really worth the investment. µ

 

Share this:

blog comments powered by Disqus
Advertisement
Subscribe to INQ newsletters

Sign up for INQbot – a weekly roundup of the best from the INQ

Advertisement
INQ Poll

Masque malware is putting iPad and iPhone user data at risk

Has news of iOS malware made you reconsider getting an iPhone?