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Youtube does a Netflix and starts shaming slow ISPs

Here be jitters
Mon Jul 07 2014, 09:32
YouTube is the world's largest video-sharing website

GOOGLE'S VIDEO SERVICE Youtube has 'done a Netflix', and has started to highlight when and from where a video is slowly loading.

Youtube is following others, and the video and television streaming industry has been fighting throttling for some time.

Users that come across a slow moving, jittery video will be shown a blue bar at the bottom of the content. Following a link offered by the bar will take users to a Google information page that discusses where, when and how videos can be throttled at the ISP level.

The webpage shows a number of countries and a selection of the internet service providers that serve them. The transparency information should let users make a more informed choice about which ISPs they use, and help them avoid streaming in the slow lane.

Results are not available for the UK at present but other geographies are covered. Also available is information about how traffic is routed and what sorts of things might get in the way of watching cat videos.

There's more information on the efforts that Youtube makes to bring you jitter-free kittens, and it said that there is a preferred network of ISPs that it tries to use to link viewers with the closest, best performing provider.

"We've invested billions of dollars in the bandwidth and infrastructure necessary to bring our services as close to your Internet Service Provider's (ISP) front door as possible, for free," it says.

"We have an open peering policy for our internal network, which means we'll directly interconnect with any ISP who can reach our 70 points of presence worldwide without charge."

The video quality report is not new, but the in-video Youtube alert and link apparently are new, and were reported by Quarz. µ

 

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