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Google to shutter Orkut social network in favour of Google+

From one failing project to another
Tue Jul 01 2014, 12:45
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GOOGLE HAS ANNOUNCED plans to shutter its ageing social network Orkut in September to focus its efforts on Google+, its other, not-so-popular social networking venture.

Google announced the shutdown in a blog post, advising users that from 30 September, Orkut will be no more. This likely won't disappoint many, perhaps apart from South Americans where the social network was oddly popular.

Google said in its post, "Ten years ago, Orkut was Google's first foray into social networking. Built as a '20 percent' project, Orkut communities started conversations, and forged connections, that had never existed before. Orkut helped shape life online before people really knew what 'social networking' was.

"We will shut down Orkut on September 30, 2014. Until then, there will be no impact on current Orkut users, to give the community time to manage the transition," the firm added, advising remaining users of the service that an archive of all public communities will be available online once Orkut is shut down.

Google also noted that, from today, it will no longer be possible to create a new account on the service, for those who were planning on setting up an Orkut account ten years later.

Google went on to clarify that the closure comes as it realigns its efforts on Youtube, Blogger and Google+, having seemingly just realised that they are more popular than its old social network.

"Over the past decade, Youtube, Blogger and Google+ have taken off, with communities springing up in every corner of the world," Google said. "We'll be focusing our energy and resources on making these other social platforms as amazing as possible for everyone who uses them." µ

 

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