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Protesters 'occupy' Google over net neutrality nonchalance

Say search firm not doing enough to preserve openness
Wed Jun 25 2014, 10:57
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ACTIVISTS are 'occupying' Google in the real world as a protest against its apparent lack of effort towards preserving net neutrality.

The occupation is happening now at the firm's Mountain View campus in California. According to people at the scene Google is attempting to remove and discourage protesters. Google has not confirmed this to us.

According to the Occupy Google website, the internet giant has a good record on defending liberty, but has not shown enough support for a cause that is presently under threat in the US by regulators and industry.

"Though Google and other major companies such as Netflix, Amazon and Microsoft have come out in support of preserving a free and open web, we believe much more can be done," says the campaign webpage.

"Google, with its immense power, has a social responsibility to uphold the values of the internet. We encourage Google to engage in a serious, honest dialogue on the issue of net neutrality and to stand with us in support of an internet that is free from censorship, discrimination, and access fees."

The campaigners will use the time until the FCC closes its public discussion forum, which already is a popular destination, to increase pressure and awareness of the issues. We have asked Google for its opinion on the occupation, but so far it has not responded.

Google has taken a lead in opposing threats to the internet in the past, and the 'occupants' asked it to return to the stance it took against the Stop Online Piracy Act (SOPA) and Protect Intellectual Property Act (PIPA). It said that a petition created by the firm then gathered some seven million signatures. µ

 

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