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Microsoft launches Interflow to pool threat data in the cloud

Aims to reduce end-user costs
Tue Jun 24 2014, 16:42
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MICROSOFT HAS LAUNCHED a private preview of security and threat information exchange service called Microsoft Interflow.

The service will produce machine-readable threat reports that are published in real-time across networks. Microsoft believes that automating this process will reduce end-user costs.

Microsoft Interflow runs on Microsoft's Azure cloud service, and can be rolled out and scaled in minutes across the Microsoft Active Protections Programme (MAPP), which the company launched in 2008 to incubate a sharing culture between security software companies.

Interflow has a plug-in architecture enabling it to integrate with existing systems easily, and relies on common formats for improved interoperability. Microsoft believes that proprietary approaches to threat management have delayed the establishment of an orchestrated threat monitoring system.

Jerry Bryant of the Microsoft Security Response Centre (MSRC) said in a blog post on Tuesday, "The inspiration for Interflow comes from the community. Today, data exchange difficulties - format mismatches, governance issues, and the complexity of data correlation - stand in the way of a more efficient incident response industry."

Microsoft has announced that it will share its own cybersecurity intelligence for the duration of the private preview. At present, network managers are invited to talk to their contact within Microsoft if they wish to join.

The company said that it will roll out Interflow to all MAPP members "in the future", though it did not mention a timeframe.

Microsoft recently found a vulnerability in its own anti-malware engine that caused a denial of service, causing it to release an out-of-cycle patch. µ

 

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