The Inquirer-Home

HTC Volantis with Nvidia Tegra K1 outed as Google’s Nexus 9 tablet

Set to arrive in the fourth quarter
Mon Jun 23 2014, 10:16

TAIWANESE PHONEMAKER HTC reportedly has been chosen to build Google's next Nexus tablet, with details regarding the 8.9in HTC Volantis having leaked over the weekend.

Android Police got its hands on the leaked specifications, and heard that the device likely will come to market as the Google Nexus 9.

HTC Nexus 9 with Android 5.0 Lollipop and an 8.9in screen

If this is true, and the website said that it is "confident" that the details it received are correct, the so-called Nexus 9 will have an 8.9in 2048x1440 resolution display with a pixel density of 281ppi, and will be powered by Nvidia's 64-bit Tegra K1 processor. There's no word as to what version of Android the device will be running, but with the tablet set for a fourth quarter release, it likely will be version Android 5.0 Lollipop.

The HTC-built Nexus 9 also reportedly will feature an 8MP rear-facing camera with optical image stablisation, a 3MP front-facing camera, optional 4G LTE support and 2GB RAM. Improving on the Nexus 7, the device reportedly will also feature an "aluminium, zero gap contraction" chassis, and will measure just 7.9mm thick.

The Google Nexus 9, according to the leak, will launch priced at $399 for the 16GB model, and $499 for the higher-capacity 32GB model. Android Police notes that the 4G models likely will be much more expensive, "possibly in the $600+ range".

HTC and Google are yet to comment, but this isn't the first rumour we've heard about HTC building the next generation Nexus tablet. In February, Taiwanese media reported that the firm was "said to have won orders for a high-end model of the Google Nexus tablet line" to debut this year. µ

 

Share this:

blog comments powered by Disqus
Advertisement
Subscribe to INQ newsletters

Sign up for INQbot – a weekly roundup of the best from the INQ

Advertisement
INQ Poll

Dead electronic devices to be banned on US-bound flights

Will the new rules banning uncharged devices be effective?