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Livelens lets you sell your life on Google Glass

Real life documentaries from your head
Tue Jun 17 2014, 17:07
Google Glass DVF sunglasses

ISRAELI STARTUP Livelens, which offers iPhone and Android users a way to stream their daily lives from their smartphones to viewers on the web, has announced an app for Google Glass.

Like other versions of the app, the Glass version streams users' lives and offers monetisation options, making it ripe for use by webcam shows, z-list celebrities, and of course, the pornography industry, with the unique selling point of a point-of-view perspective.

The move represents an life-mimicking-art event, with echoes of William Gibson's dystopian novel "All Tomorrow's Parties" and the long-running Channel 4 sitcom Peep Show, which is filmed predominantly with head mounted cameras.

However, Google Glass will have to undergo significant improvements before it becomes viable for anything more than bitesized chunks of video. Google Glass' battery life for video streaming is so short that Google removed video calling functionality in a recent update.

Capturing a zeitgeist like Google Glass is nothing new for an app builder, which is used to courting controversy. In February this year, the company was criticised for employing Thamsanga Jantjie, the sign-language interpreter who achieved worldwide notoriety after signing jibberish at Nelson Mandela's funeral, to be its advertising spokeperson.

Google Glass remains in beta through the company's Explorer programme, however it was recently opened to anyone who wishes to join, providing that they live in the US and have $1,500 to buy the augmented reality eyewear.

The retail version of Glass is expected to be significantly lower in price. Rumours are circulating that Google will open the Explorer programme internationally next week to coincide with its annual I/O Developer Conference. µ

 

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