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Pinterest hack sees users unknowingly tweet about weight loss and Asian fruit

Second attack on website in 18 months
Mon Jun 16 2014, 11:43

PINBOARD-STYLE PHOTO SHARING WEBSITE Pinterest has been hacked again, which has resulted in users posting links and pins about a non-existent Asian fruit and how much weight they've supposedly lost eating it.

The spam also spread to Twitter, with the same weight loss-related messages of "An Asian fruit that burns fat for you? Yes please!" and "I'm 12 pounds lighter as of today!" appearing with a link to the spam post on the Pinterest webpage.

Below is just a snippet of the hundreds of spam links users have posted on Twitter about the enigmatic Asian fruit and supposed weight loss successes.

Twitter pinterest hack weightloss spam

The disappointing thing is, we're still none the wiser as to what the mysterious Asian Fruit is. Maybe they are referring to Kumquat?

Twitter pinterest hack asian fruit

This is not the first time Pinterest has been hacked. Users of the website were hit by a hacking attack at Zendesk in February 2013, which hosts customer service software for the company as well as Tumblr and Twitter.

Zendesk confirmed the attack on its website shortly after the news spread, sheepishly admitting that it had fallen victim to online hackers.

As with the previous attack, security experts at Sophos have warned those affected to keep a keen eye on emails and links they click on within them, and although no passwords were stolen in the breach, it's still a serious attack.

For instance, the hackers that have stolen the email addresses could craft malicious emails to the email addresses of Pinterest users and try to trick them into clicking on dangerous links or attachments. µ

 

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