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P.F. Chang's admits to credit and debit card theft

Goes back to offline payment taking
Fri Jun 13 2014, 10:22
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UNITED STATES RESTAURANT CHAIN P.F. Chang's is the latest outfit to step up and tell its customers that it has served user credit and debit card data like so much dim sum.

Chang's is following a recent trend of companies that have admitted to a breach and theft. It has taken a rather old school approach, at least partly, and is now taking card payments via the old imprint and sign method.

P.F. Chang's CEO Rick Federico revealed the unwanted takeaway order in a blog post a day after reports linked the firm to a data loss.

He admitted that an incident occurred and said that the firm is working to sort it all out.

"On Tuesday, June 10, P.F. Chang's learned of a security compromise that involves credit and debit card data reportedly stolen from some of our restaurants," he said.

"Immediately, we initiated an investigation with the United States Secret Service and a team of third-party forensics experts to understand the nature and scope of the incident, and while the investigation is still ongoing, we have concluded that data has been compromised."

Federico went into the post-breach playbook and informed blog readers that "the safety and security" of its customers is a priority, adding that customers that still want to visit its restaurants can pay with the old "manual credit card imprinting" system.

The firm has set up an information website where punters can check updates and post questions. However, Federico added that these are early days in the company's investigation, and advised customers to check their accounts and payments for unapproved transactions.

Reports about the leak began to appear on Thursday 11 June. Federico said that the company was informed of the incident on 10 June by the US Secret Service. µ

 

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