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Console OS will let you run Android on a Windows PC or tablet

$10 buys you updates and your say in the company
Thu Jun 12 2014, 16:42
windroid

A COMPANY in Santa Clara, California is looking for funding to launch a version of Android specifically designed for Windows PCs and tablets.

Mobile Media Ventures has launched a crowdfunding drive on Kickstarter to bring its fork of Android 4.4 Kitkat, called Console OS, to devices running Windows as a dual-boot option.

The firm's pitch reads, "We’ve taken Android apart, and put it back together for your PC. Console OS is a fork of Android designed to take everything that has made mobile awesome, and bring it back to your PC. This isn't an emulator and this isn’t homebrew."

While the Android mobile operating system (OS) itself is stable, the makers will use the money to work with PC makers to be a viable dual-boot option, overcoming the limitations of emulators and baked-in runtimes such as Bluestacks.

The success of Android on PC is always hampered by two major problems. The first is the need for good keyboard and mouse support, but given Microsoft's recent record with Windows 8, you would be forgiven for overlooking that one.

The second is the dominance of the Intel x86 architecture in PC computing, as opposed the ARM dominace of mobile devices. Intel has made faltering inroads into mobile devices and several models of hybrid and even smartphones have been made with Intel chips, but the Console OS team had to make a number of significant changes to the code in order to make it run on PCs.

Kickstarter backers who donate $10, or about £6, or more will be given lifetime access to updates to the Console OS fork of Android, as well as 10 votes in the democratic decision process over which phone makers, models and chips should be targetted first.

If funding, which runs until 11 August, is successful, the first builds will be available to backers in December, though some of the language on the company site suggests that the wait may be significantly shorter. µ

 

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