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Fusion IO launches Atomic range of flash storage products

Doubles its predecessor at over six terabytes
Thu Jun 05 2014, 16:41
Fusion-io Atomic Series flash accelerator

FUSION IO HAS announced its latest generation of flash memory storage.

The Atomic Series is based on 19-21nm chips, doubling the maximum capacity for its products over previous generations to 6.4TB.

Fusion IO doesn't use standard removable drives in its flash storage, making its servers significantly smaller than traditional rack based systems.

Gary Orenstein, Fusion IO VP of Product told The INQUIRER, "The reason you have removable drives in a rack is because you want to replace them in the event of failure. Flash is now so reliable that you can just install in and forget it, so the need for older form factors is no longer there."

In addition to reduced latency, Fusion IO claims that the product has "self healing" properties to improve relability and a smaller power footprint.

The Atomic Series is made up of two models. The premium PX600 model has a read I/Os per second rating of up to 276,000 IOPS, and write rating of up to 375,000 IOPS. The SX300 model offers 180,000 read IOPS and 285,000 write IOPS.

Both products come with a five year guarantee and are optimised for use with Windows, Linux, Unix and VMware. But Orenstein said, "Unless you give them one heck of a hammering, they'll go on years longer than that."

Orenstein went on to say, "We're not far off the all flash data centre for all. Of course I'm not saying that the hard drive will be completely obsolete tomorrow, but flash is now becoming cost-effective enough that its low latency will start to become the norm."

In April, Fusion IO announced that it had perfected a technique for on-the-fly data encryption, allowing speed boosts of up to 80 percent in a MySQL environment. µ

 

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