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Microsoft presses the US government on NSA reform

Wants PRISM gone
Thu Jun 05 2014, 11:11
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MICROSOFT HAS USED the one year anniversary of Edward Snowden's PRISM revelations to return to the US National Security Agency (NSA) and asked for more disclosure freedom.

Since the PRISM revelations broke, Microsoft and others have called on the US government and courts and asked for changes in both the system and how they can respond to it, and in the way they report those responses.

Microsoft's latest effort in a blog post from general counsel Brad Smith says that the parties have "unfinished business" and warned that the government backed activities are undermining and destabilising the IT industry.

"The US Government needs to address important unfinished business to reduce the technology trust deficit it has created," said Smith.

"We [have] learned that the government was not just seeking a relatively small amount of content from internet companies via legal orders. It's now apparent that the government intercepted data in transit across the internet and hacked links between company data centers. These disclosures rightly have prompted a vigorous debate over the extent and scope of government surveillance, leading to some positive changes. But much more needs to be done."

There is a lot worrying Smith and Microsoft, and there a lot of changes that he would like to see. They are mostly the issues that we have heard about before, and the requests include the suggestions that the NSA stop heavily leaning on technology companies at home and abroad.

"We need to strike a better balance between privacy and national security to restore trust and uphold our fundamental liberties," he added.

"A year after the first news reports, there is much more to do. The US has both a responsibility and an opportunity to show new leadership on these issues." µ

 

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