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Google releases its first 64-bit Chrome web browser

Faster and more stable than 32-bit
Wed Jun 04 2014, 15:49
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GOOGLE'S CHROMIUM PROJECT has released its first 64-bit edition of the Chrome web browser for Windows.

The project manages Google's open-source web browser code underlying the Chrome browser and Chrome OS. It claims that the new build is up to 25 percent faster than the standard 32-bit version, particularly for graphics and multimedia content. In addition crash rates for rendering are down nearly 50 percent from the 32-bit version.

The 64-bit version, which has full functionality, also takes advantage of additional security features in 64-bit Windows architecture such as High Entropy ASLR, as well as improving existing measures like heap partitioning.

At present, the new version is only available to Windows 7 and 8 users. The build is not considered stable yet, and is only available in the Developer or Canary (nightly build) channels.

Existing Chrome users can load the 64-bit version over the installed 32-bit edition without having to uninstall. In addition, all settings are preserved, though as with any test build, it might bork some of your add-ons.

Google software engineer Will Harris said, "We encourage all our users, especially developers, to give the new 64-bit Chrome a spin, and we're looking forward to hearing your feedback so we can make 64-bit Chrome work great and bring its benefits to our Beta and Stable channel users."

We've been using the 64-bit version of Chrome in the INQUIRER office this morning and it certainly appears to be significantly faster and smoother, and as of yet, everything works.

Google has also announced support for the Reset The Net campaign, and launched an extension for Chrome that provides end-to-end encryption. µ

 

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