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Google celebrates extended Chromebook availability with bad poetry

Low-cost devices arrive in nine more countries
Tue Jun 03 2014, 17:25

Google Chrome logoGOOGLE HAS INTRODUCED Chromebooks in nine more countries, and has celebrated with a cringeworthy poem.

The low-cost laptops running the company's Chrome operating system (OS) are coming to New Zealand, the Phillipines, Norway, Denmark, Mexico, Chile, Belgium, Spain and Italy. The range was already available in the US and Canada, as well as the UK, Australia, France, Germany, Ireland and the Netherlands.

In honour of the occasion, Chromebooks marketing director David Shapiro wrote a series of rhyming couplets to welcome the new arrivals, which among other things, rhymes "Philippines" with "what this means", suggesting that when it comes to poetry, Mr Shapiro is very good at marketing.

The news follows the recent addition of six new countries for the Chromecast screencasting dongle, which is now also available in Australia, Belgium, Japan, Korea, Portugal and Switzerland.

Today, Google has also announced that WatchESPN has gained Chromecast compatibility in time for the World Cup in Brazil, which begins next week, allowing US football fans who insist on calling it soccer to be able to catch every goal, foul and Mexican wave.

The range of Chromebooks available and pricing will vary from country to country, but notable by its absence is the £1000 touchscreen flagship Chromebook Pixel, which is not on the inventory for any of the new countries.

Chromebooks are proving a success for Google, but at this year's Computex, a number of device makers are also looking towards Android powered laptops, meaning that Google could end up competing with itself in the operating systems market. µ

 

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