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Fish dating website refuses to swim with a shakedown

Plenty of Fish won’t pay ransom demand, gets attacked
Wed May 21 2014, 10:39
hacker-computer

OPTIMISTIC DATING WEBSITE Plenty of Fish has suffered a denial of service attack because it refused to bend to a ransom demand for $2,000.

The website has posted a note about its experience, and said that it will never make deals with hackers. Its users might take this to mean that they should possibly expect periods of downtime.

The refusal to bend pushed singletons into the darkness as Plenty of Fish resisted its chance to give a malevolent stranger $2,000.

"We hate downtime and work round the clock to keep our services up and running. Today, many of you experienced a rare service outage," it said, and posted a copy of an early morning missive that had come its way.

That brief message warned the dating website that a storm was coming and offered the chance of talks. Talks, as much as they were, led to the offer of a '$2,000 and I will back off' proposition. That did not lure the fish outfit, which said that it often gets blanks fired in its direction. This was different though, and after an initial burst from a 40Gbps distributed denial of service (DDoS) attack, the $2,000 cessation offer came in.

"It's not unusual for a large target like us to receive threats that often turn out to be fake, but at 8:13am we were hit by a very large distributed denial of service (DDoS) attack that initially took our website down and subsequently also impacted our mobile users," it said.

"This thing peaked at 40Gbps (40 gigabits per second). If you are familiar with the TV show House of Cards (the modern version with Kevin Spacey), 40Gbps is like downloading the whole of series one in a single second."

The website managed to block the attack off within a few hours and without involving its accounting people. It added that no personal data was affected or lost, and that it would endeavour to prevent such incidents in the future.

Users, and Plenty of Fish said that it has 70 million registered ones, were advised to return to their eye fluttering and flirting. µ

 

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