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Telias transatlantic cable link goes down and messes with your internet

Worst things happen undersea
Tue May 20 2014, 10:47
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A TELECOMMUNICATIONS PROBLEM slowed down internet connections last night, according to telecoms firm Telias.

Twitter had already reacted to a slowdown and its users were quick to complain about laggard services. Some suggested that an undersea cable had been cut, while others speculated that a shark bite might have caused the problem.

Swedish firm Telias confirmed the problem, saying that something happened during an update, and that it impacted traffic between the US and Asia.

"Our previous disruption on our internet traffic against the United States and Asia is eliminated since 23 o'clock, it was a planned update went wrong," it said in a message late yesterday.

Cloud hosting firm Digitalocean reported that its services were suffering from the problem, posting a statement on its information webpages that said that the problem extended to European users.

"At this time we're experience a network outage in our AMS1 and AMS2 datacenters. With secondary impact affecting customers in Europe. As a result, you may experience latency, connectivity issues, or slow pings," it said.

"Preliminary investigation indicates that Telias transatlantic cable are down. We are working to resolve the issue and apologize for any interruption this causes for you."

Cloudflare also noticed a slowdown of its network, tweeting that it was enduring a problem in Europe.

Later Telias confirmed that European services were impacted in a response to a question on Twitter.

Much of the rest of its Twitter messages are the repeated explanation - the planned update that went sour, and apologies. In its latest messages it said that the problem should now be fixed. µ

 

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