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Google offers millions for tech charity projects

Technology and cash to change the world
Thu May 15 2014, 11:09
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GOOGLE HAS REVISITED its Impact Challenge fund with a fresh stash of cash for investing in technology projects to do good works.

Google has £3.2m that it plans to chop up into £500,000 and £200,000 pieces and award to projects. It has some history of doing this, and we have previously seen the firm put money into saving rhinos.

There is an application process for the Google Impact Challenge, and the judging panel will take a chin-stroking stance in July. Four plans will get half a million, while six more will be awarded £200,000.

Judging will be luminaries including Jimmy 'Web' Wales, Peter 'Dragon' Jones and Emma 'Telly' Freud.

"At Google, we get very excited by innovations that make peoples' lives better. The Impact Challenge gives us the chance to focus that passion on the dynamic British non-profit community," said Matt Brittin, who is both a judge and Google VP for Northern and Central Europe

"Charitable organisations and modern technology both have the power to transform lives, so I'd encourage all UK charities to think big and apply."

Britten also judged the Impact Challenge last year and then the Kenyan rhino Raspberry Pi plan was given a winning nod and a solar green light. We heard later last year that the system has had an immediate and positive impact.

Jimmy Wales welcomed the opportunity to put on a judging hat and assess the entries. "The Google Impact Challenge gives every charity in the UK the opportunity to consider how they can harness the unprecedented power of technology to achieve their aims," he said. "And I am very proud to be a part of an initiative that helps worthy causes deliver life-changing results." µ

 

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