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Seagate outs 2TB wireless hard drive with support for Android, iOS and Windows 8

Take all of the files, all of the places, all of the times
Wed May 07 2014, 16:24

STORAGE MAKER Seagate has announced expansion of its range of wireless hard drives.

The Seagate Wireless Plus portable hard drive, which won a Best of Innovations award at CES in 2013, was previously available with 1TB capacity. On Wednesday the Seagate announced that it has released a 2TB model, as well as a 500GB edition.

Seagate Wireless Plus

Aimed squarely at extending available storage on mobile devices, the Seagate Wireless Plus hard drive integrates with apps for Android, iOS, Kindle Fire, Windows 8 and Windows RT.

The device is also fully compliant with DLNA, Apple Airplay, Blu-ray and with an app for Samsung branded Smart TVs.

The Wireless Plus communicates via WiFi, creating its own WiFi network that connects either directly to your device or acts as a proxy to your existing WiFi network. Sandisk has used a similar approach with its recent line of portable wireless drives that offer similar functionality but with smaller capacities and form factors.

The Seagate Wireless Plus also integrates with existing cloud services including Google Drive and Dropbox to allow syncing for offline access to stored files or backup of your own files to the cloud.

The Seagate Wireless Plus is available in the US now for $199.99 for the 2TB model, $179.99 for the 1TB model, and from this Friday, $149 for the 500GB model, with UK prices to follow. However, with only $50 difference for four times the capacity, we wonder why anyone would entertain anything less than the full 2GB.

Seagate recently revealed that it had created the world's fastest 6TB drive, which included the magically titled "multi-drive rotational vibration tolerance" technology. µ

 

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