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Microsoft soups up Onedrive for desktop and Android

Nothing earth shattering but progress is good
Wed May 07 2014, 14:44

MICROSOFT HAS ANNOUNCED a number of enhancements to its cloud storage service Onedrive that it is rolling out to users.

For desktop, Onedrive now includes an "all photos" view for the first time, coupled with an increased thumbnail size.

Microsoft OneDrive camera display improvements

Also new is an update to social integration, allowing users to publish videos as well as photos to Facebook.

Finally, the option to specify a cover photo for photo albums has been added as an override to the automatic selection made by Onedrive in earlier versions.

The blog post announcing the enhancements suggested that they are in response to user demand, but also conveniently bring the service more firmly into line with rival offerings from Google and Dropbox.

The bigger changes come to the Android app, and considering the relative levels of animosity between Microsoft and Google, it's refreshing to see that common sense has prevailed with Microsoft's development of Android support.

The Android app, which is available for all versions including and later than Android 4.0 Ice Cream Sandwich, gains a number of file management tools including file and folder sharing, updating of sharing preferences, multiple file download and file moving and sorting, all of which bring the mobile version into line with the desktop edition.

Onedrive's integration with Windows 8 and aggressive business pricing have seen the service becoming more accepted alongside rivals like Google Drive and Dropbox. Microsoft renamed the Onedrive service earlier this year after legal action from British Sky Broadcasting forced a name change from the earlier Skydrive. µ

 

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