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Canonical kills Ubuntu pocket PC for Android

But doesn't rule out relaunch
Thu May 01 2014, 15:37
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CANONICAL HAS ADMITTED that it has ceased development of its Ubuntu for Android (U4A), the Linux pocket PC.

The ambitious project meant putting the entire Ubuntu Linux desktop operating system into a bootable partition on a mobile phone flash drive, which could then be run along with the tethered Android phone by splitting the workload between the processor cores.

The idea would allow users who wanted to retain Android for their phone to become Ubuntu desktop users.

News came after a bug report was posted and hastily removed from the U4A project website, that, according to the OMG Ubuntu news website read, "[The website] describes Ubuntu for Android (U4A) as 'the must-have feature for late-2012 high-end Android phones. Ubuntu for Android is no longer in development, so this page should be retired, along with [the features section]."

However, Canonical issued a statement to Android Authority that confirmed the news, saying, "We still believe that U4A is a great product concept and that consumers would welcome the feature. The development within Ubuntu for U4A is complete. To take the development further requires a launch partner in order to make the necessary modifications on the Android side."

Ubuntu for phones, which is moving towards full convergence with the rest of the Ubuntu Linux operating system, has taken focus for the company, with Canonical having recently announced launch hardware partners.

Canonical said that it will consider revisiting the project if a likely launch partner makes itself known, however for the time being it appears that Ubuntu for Android is a dead duck. µ

 

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