The Inquirer-Home

Apple, Samsung and Microsoft commit to anti-theft smartphone kill switch

To be implemented on devices in the US from July 2015
Wed Apr 16 2014, 10:33
mobile phone theft

TECHNOLOGY GIANTS Apple, Samsung and Microsoft, among others, have committed to introducing anti-thief kill switches on smartphone devices, enabling users to easily lock and wipe a handset if it gets stolen.

Starting in July 2015, all smartphones made by the companies onboard with the initiative - a list that also includes Google, Nokia, HTC and Huawei - will come with free anti-theft tools preloaded on the devices or ready to be downloaded, wireless association CTIA announced on Tuesday.

CTIA said, "Each device manufacturer and operating system signatory of Part I of this 'Smartphone Anti-Theft Voluntary Commitment' agrees that new models of smartphones first manufactured after July 2015 for retail sale in the United States will offer, at no cost to consumers, a baseline anti-theft tool that is preloaded or downloadable on wireless smartphones."

These anti-theft "kill switches" will allow users to easily wipe personal data from a smartphone if it gets lost or stolen, and will enable the device to be remotely locked, rendering the smartphone useless to any unauthorised users. This will be reversible, CTIA said, if a device is recovered by its authorised user.

New York attorney general Eric Schneiderman and San Francisco district attorney George Gascon welcomed the agreement, but said it fell short of the measures they have advocated to prevent theft.

"While CTIA's decision to respond to our call for action by announcing a new voluntary commitment to make theft-deterrent features available on smartphones is a welcome step forward, it falls short of what is needed to effectively end the epidemic of smartphone theft," the prosecutors said in a joint statement reported by Reuters.

The agreement is expected to save US smartphone users $2.5bn a year. µ

 

Share this:

blog comments powered by Disqus
Advertisement
Subscribe to INQ newsletters

Sign up for INQbot – a weekly roundup of the best from the INQ

Advertisement
INQ Poll

Microsoft's Windows 10 Preview has permission to watch your every move

Does Microsoft have the right to keylog users of its Windows 10 Technical Preview?