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Stratasys launches world's first multi-material colour 3D printer in the UK

Exclusive Uses plastic in traditional inkjet colours
Tue Apr 15 2014, 17:01

COVENTRY: 3D PRINTER MAKER Stratasys launched what it claims is the first multi-material full colour 3D printer on Tuesday in the UK, the Objet500 Connex3.

The colour 3D printer, which was first unveiled in January, is designed to drastically change design, engineering and manufacturing processes and was shown off today at the Deveop3d Live conference at Warwick University by Industrial Plastic Fabrications (IPF), the 3D printing services company that is the first to bring the Stratasys Objet500 Connex3 to Blighty.

Revealed at the Solidworks World 2014 convention in San Diego in January, the Stratasys Objet500 Connex3 Colour Multi-material 3D Printer uses coloured plastic in the traditional inkjet colours of cyan, magenta, and yellow. It is the only 3D Printer that enables colour 3D printing with virtually unlimited combinations of rigid, flexible and transparent materials, as well as digital resources, in a single print run.

The 3D printer makes possible functionally complex models with desirable mechanical properties such as tensile strength, elongation before breaking, and multiple hardness values.

For example, the printer is able to print 3D glasses using an "opaque Veroyellow" material for the frame, a rubber-like black "Tangoblackplus" material and a translucent yellow tint for the lenses, all in one print job with no assembly required.

This means that you could design a pair of swim goggles, for example, and once you have an initial design, you could print the goggles in colour, including the tinted lenses plus flexible parts, without needing to print the parts separately and assemble them later. µ

 

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