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Google wants you to take Glass to work

Consider the glassibilities
Wed Apr 09 2014, 14:23
Google Glass is now available in the UK for 1000

AUGMENTED REALITY EYEWEAR INVENTOR Google wants businesses to consider how they can best adopt Glass, its nose-borne web access gadget.

Glass is not welcome in some businesses, cinemas, on the roads, or in strip clubs and casinos, but there is no reason why it shouldn't be welcome in other enterprises, claimed Google.

A few companies and organisations are using Glass already, and Google has named a brace of them in its appeal to other enterprises.

"The Washington Capitals and Schlumberger are just two of the companies that are at the forefront of exploring new possibilities with Glass. The Washington Capitals partnered with APX Labs to create a fan experience where real time stats, instant replay and different camera angles are all brought directly to Capitals fans via Glass," it said.

"Schlumberger, the world's largest oilfield services company, partnered with Wearable Intelligence and is using Glass to increase safety and efficiency for their employees in the field."

There is room for more Glass use, of course, and while New York's finest are trialing the eyewear, so too are you invited. Google asked Businesses and developers to register their interest at the Glass Developers Forum under the Glass at Work section.

"In the last year we've seen our Explorers use Glass in really inspiring and practical day-to-day ways. Something we've also noticed and are very excited about is how Explorers are using Glass to drive their businesses forward," said Google.

"This is only the beginning of what's possible for Glass and business. If you're a developer who is creating software for US based enterprises, we'd love your help in building the future of Glass at Work." µ

 

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