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Google jumps on Windows XP's demise with Chromebook for business offer

Offers firms up to $200 off each Chromebook they buy
Wed Apr 09 2014, 10:21

Google HP Chromebook 11 top view

GOOGLE HAS BEEN QUICK to jump on the demise of Windows XP, and is looking to persuade businesses still running the operating system to buy Google Chromebooks instead.

Windows XP reached end of life on Tuesday, and Google has wasted no time in tempting businesses still running Windows XP.

Google took a dig at Microsoft, advising businesses that they have been 'held back' from migrating and suggesting that now might be the time to do it.

Google Enterprise president Amit Singh said, "In addition to the nearly 30 percent of desktops still running [Windows] XP, many businesses are in a tough spot. Despite 'significant' security and privacy risks, legacy software or custom-built apps have held businesses back from migrating in time for today's [Windows] XP support deadline.

"Companies in this position now find themselves at a timely crossroads. It's time for a real change, rather than more of the same.

"Chromebooks for Business offers you a secure and easy-to-use computing experience, along with a central web-based management console and lower total cost of ownership. If you've been considering Chromebooks for your company, until June 30, we're sweetening the deal."

While Google attempt to attract business users might appear cheap, the firm's deals might tempt customers. For example, businesses that decide to switch to Google Chromebooks will get $100 off each managed deviced that they buy, and if they opt for a device with VMWare Desktop as a Service onboard, they will get a $200 discount.

"Don't let your business go the way of tamagotchis and parachute pants. It's time for a real change - something we can all agree upon," Singh added.

Google's campaign comes a week after the London Borough of Barking and Dagenham announced plans to migrate from Windows XP to Google Chrome OS, a move that it estimated will save it over £400,000. µ

 

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