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MongoDB celebrates open source with version 2.6

Touted as 'most significant release yet'
Tue Apr 08 2014, 16:56
Binary storage code

OPEN SOURCE DATABASE MongoDB reached version 2.6 on Tuesday after a six month developer test.

The new version adds a range of enhancements that product manager Mat Keep described as the "most significant release ever".

New in this edition is an advanced management and administrative tooling module. MongoDB Management Service (MMS) already has 35,000 users and will make MongoDB "as easy to use as it is to develop against".

Also included are improved enterprise grade security features aimed at ensuring that personally identifiable data is even more secure, and an integrated search engine that allows developers to create and visualise large data clusters without a separate search engine built into the stack.

The MMS service also includes improved backup with the ability to create snapshots of large quantities of data as incremental backups.

Keep spoke with The INQUIRER about the release, and we took the opportunity to ask him why the open source software development model works so well.

He said, "Look back over the past ten years, virtually nothing has come to market that has made an impact that isn't open source. Look at where the real innovation is coming from, that's all open souce software - that's the solutions that have really mattered."

With the news that Microsoft has started to loosen its grip on some of its proprietary code, is this the beginning of a sea change?

Keep replied, "The days of proprietary applications might be almost consigned to history. There'll always be a need for vertical solutions for specific specialist needs, but for wider adopted applications, horizontal build structure is invariably going to be better."

MongoDB is available for download now. µ

 

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