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Seagate announces 'world's fastest' 6TB hard drive

Complete with multi-drive rotational vibration tolerance
Mon Apr 07 2014, 16:32

SEAGATE HAS ANNOUNCED what it claims is the fastest 6TB drive on the market.

The Seagate Enterprise Capacity 3.5 HDD v4 is aimed at cloud data centres and boasts a 25 percent speed boost over competing hard drives.

Fitted with multi-drive rotational vibration tolerance, the drive is aimed at accurate storage of data in an increasingly dense package. The 7200RPM drive also includes ramp load technology and a humidity sensor.

enterprise-capacity-3-5-6tb-dynamic-400x400

Seagate also claims that the optimal energy T10 and T13 compliant power management standards incorporated into the drive can lead to running cost savings of up to 90 percent.

"Cloud service providers look for innovative ways to store more within an existing footprint while lowering operational costs," said Seagate marketing VP Scott Horn. "Seagate is poised to address this challenge by offering the fastest 6TB enterprise capacity HDD based on our proven, reliable platform meeting this never-ending demand in both private and public cloud data centers."

In addition the reliability, Seagate's new hard drives also self-encrypt for security and include an instant secure erase feature for disposal or repurposing.

The Seagate Enterprise Capacity 3.5 HDD v4 is available in 12GB/sec SAS and 6GB/sec SATA versions and is now available to select cloud partners and resellers, with full integration into the business line coming this spring.

Seagate subsiduary Lacie recently announced its own "worlds fastest" Thunderbolt 2 compliant Little Big Drive, capable of transfer speeds of up to 2.6GB/sec. Seagate also announced a 12.1mm external hard drive at this years CES. µ

 

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